Tag Archives: garage

Golden Era

Golden-Era-

“Golden Era” (2007 Survey)

(318/12) 570-572 O’Farrell Street; Hotel Stratton, Sweden House Hotel (2007). Rooming house with forty-two-rooms and ten baths. 3B stories; brick structure; terra cotta trim, quoins, galvanized iron brackets, beltcourse and cornice; two-part commercial composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: arched entry with keystone. Alterations: security gate and grilles, balcony removed, storefronts. Original owner: Ernest Brand. Builder: J.D. Harmer Construction Company. 1907.

(318/9) 550-560 O’Farrell Street; Abbey Garage. 2B stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, gargoyles, buttress piers, decorative frieze, balcony; Gothic ornamentation. Alterations: aluminum windows. Original owner: Mt. Olivet Cemetery Association. Architect: W.H. Crim, Jr. 1924.

(318/8) 540 O’Farrell Street; Farallone Apartments. Apartment building with thirty-six two- and three-room units. 6B stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, griffins-supported balcony, five-story bay windows, decorative friezes, crenellated cornice; three-part vertical composition; Gothic ornamentation; vestibule: pointed arch, marble steps, scored walls, hanging lamp. Alterations: security gate. Original owner: Carl H. Peterson, contractor. Architect: August G. Headman. 1922.

(318/7) 502-530 O’Farrell Street; Hotel Shawmut, Marymount Hotel (1913), Coast Hotel (2007). Stores and mid-priced hotel with 140 rooms and eighty-three baths. 6B stories; brick structure; terra cotta trim, rusticated second level with decorative brick bands and arches, iron balconies and cornice; three-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: bracketed marquee; storefronts: some with decorative iron muntins. Alterations: security grilles, vestibule, corner storefront. Original owner: Mrs. Alice Pease, widow Nelson L. Pease of Central Pacific Railroad. Architect: L.B. Dutton. 1912.

The name of the vegetarian restaurant in the lower level of the Sweden House Hotel is also an apt name for the time in San Francisco history during which the Tenderloin was entirely rebuilt.

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Jones Below Ellis

Jones-below-Ellis

“Jones Below Ellis” (2007 Survey)

(333/1) 401-421 Ellis Street; Gashwiler Apartments, St. George Apartments. Apartment building with eighteen two-, three-, and four-room units. 4B stories; brick structure with galvanized iron cornice; keystones, bracketed lintels; two-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: square column order with decorative tile at entry, mosaic floor, paneled walls and ceiling, wood and glass doorway; lobby: stair landing; storefronts: Moderne corner bar (“Jonell”) with vitrolite between tile-faced storefronts; bronze plaques flank door with “St. George 2-3-4 Room Apartments”; partial alterations to storefronts. Original owner: Laura Lowell Gashwiler. Architect: Julius E. Krafft. 1907.

(333/2) 345 Jones Street; apartment hotel with thirty one-, two- and three-room units. 5B stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, five-story bay windows, galvanized iron cornice, three-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: Moderne entry frame. Alterations: security gate. Original owner: Mrs. J. Baldwin. Architect: O’Brien Brothers. 1912.

(333/4) 335-341 Jones Street; stores. 1-story; reinforced concrete structure. Alterations: facade stripped of all ornament. Original owner: Robert Ibersen. Architect: T. Paterson Ross. 1919.

(333/5) 333 Jones Street; garage. 2-stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, castellated parapet; two-part commercial composition; alterations: steel roll-up doors. Designer and owner unknown. l930.

(333/6) 302-316 Eddy Street; Herald Hotel. Mid-priced hotel with 159 rooms and 106 baths. 7B stories; steel frame structure and brick walls with terra cotta trim; second floor window surrounds, belt courses, three-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule with coffered ceiling; lobby: desk and lounge space with pilaster order and coffered ceiling; iron and glass marquee with “Hotel Herald”. Alterations: entry, storefronts replaced in style of 1910s. Owners: Laura Hirschfeld 1910, Citizens Housing Corporation and RHC Communities 2004. Architect: Alfred Henry Jacobs 1910, Schwartz & Rothschild 2004. 1910.

The storefront at 335 Jones Street (identifiable in this photo by the blank, pink-colored blade sign) was formerly the Black Rose, a transgender bar that featured live impersonations of famous female singers. A friend of mine, Nikki Harris, used to perform there as Ella Fitzgerald. The St. George Apartments were originally named for Laura Lowell Gashwiler, widow of a gold mining millionaire and one of the first kindergarten teachers in the United States.

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Time Portal

Time-Portal-

“Time Portal” (2003)

(319/8) 620-626 O’Farrell Street; Annandale House. Store and rooming house with fourteen rooms and four baths. 3B stories; brick structure; galvanized iron cornice; two-part commercial composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: terrazzo steps, tile floor. Alterations: storefront, security gate. Original owners: George S. Hill and Wilcox. Architect: George A. Dodge. 1908.

Near the only twenty-four-hour store in the Tenderloin was a little laundromat with the unlikely name of Snow Bell. The Snow Bell Laundromat for many years occupied the ground floor of a tiny old rooming house that I have always found intriguing, not because it is decrepit, but because it is so modestly genteel in its decrepitude. It is a very old building. Alongside the rooming house is Harlem Alley, a narrow cul-de-sac that adjoins a miniscule parking lot behind the Admiral Hotel next door. From sidewalk to parking lot is a span of six feet at most, but that six feet of wall speaks volumes.

Summer-Day---Farrell-Street

“Summer Day – O’Farrell Street” (2007 Survey)

(319/8) 620-626 O’Farrell Street; Annandale House.

(319/9) 628-630 O’Farrell Street; apartment building with eight two- and three-room units. 4B stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, three-story bay windows; two-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: octagonal columns, cornice molding. Alterations: security gate, storefront. Original owner: E.V. Lacey. Contractor: Monson Brothers. 1921.

(319/10) 640-642 O’Farrell Street; Allen Garage. 2B stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, hood moldings over windows and doors, cornice, stepped parapet; two-part commercial composition; Gothic ornamentation; alterations: steel roll-up doors, aluminum doors. Original owner: L.W. Allen. Architects: O’Brien Brothers. 1924.

(319/12) 646 O’Farrell Street; Madrone Apartments, Farlow Apartments. Apartment building with eleven two-room units. 3B stories; brick structure; Flemish bond brick and galvanized iron bay windows; two-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: marble steps and walls, cornice molding. Alterations: security gate, aluminum windows, addition in vestibule. Original owner: Hugh K. McKevitt, attorney. Architect: C.O. Clausen. 1915.

(319/13) 656-658 O’Farrell Street; Hermione Apartments, Ada Court Apartments. Apartment building with seventeen two- and three-room units. 5B stories; brick structure; bay windows and cornice, two-tone brick with marble inlay; three-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: marble steps, tile floor, cornice molding; lobby: marble steps, pilaster order, cornice molding. Alterations: security gate. Original owner: Herman Hogrefe. Architect: Edward E. Young. 1916.

(319/16) 666 O’Farrell Street; Sovereign Apartments. Apartment building with thirty-three two- and three-room units. 5B stories; reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, three-story bay windows, rusticated base, cornice, panels with urns; two-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: arched entry with cartouche, marble floor and wainscoting, coffered vault, decorative iron in doorway; lobby: marble steps, cornice molding, metal and glass hanging lamp; alterations: security gate, aluminum windows above first floor. Original owner: Mrs. Mary K. Ladd. Architects: Baumann and Jose. 1924.

(322/6A) 400-410 Hyde Street; Ben Hur Apartments. Apartment building with sixty-nine two-room units. 7B stories; steel frame and reinforced concrete structure; stucco facade, chariots on spandrel panels, five- and six-story bay windows, cornice; two-part vertical composition; Renaissance/Baroque ornamentation; vestibule: arched entry surround with decorative panels, marble floor, decorative side and ceiling moldings; lobby: decorative column order with beamed ceiling. Alterations: none. Original owner and builder: Louis Johnson. 1926.

The Snow Bell Laundromat has been replaced by the Dim Sum Bar, a major improvement, although Harlem Alley is now gated, making that wonderful side wall inaccessible. The Annandale was occupied by a private hospital in 1929 and the ground floor was a Safeway store in 1937.

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